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Growing up amidst family secrets and lost dreams, Rose Donovan, a TV reporter from Chicago, wants to discover her own dream. Buy the Book

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The ancient laws of Ireland provide one of the most comprehensive mirrors of society in Ireland in the early middle ages.  The law with its emphasis on honor, truth, fairness and equity and its complex procedures demonstrates a very high level of social maturity and sophistication. Buy the Book!

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The first Irish photographs date from 1840, a year after Louis Daguerre announced his discovery of the photographic process. In the century that followed, Ireland was to know tragedy and triumph, bitter struggle, and agonized compromise. Buy the Book!

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Close the Floor brings together a distinguished and diverse cast of dance ethnographers, dancers, teachers, choreographers, and dance historians to discuss and reflect on a variety of topics in the world of Irish step dance and related percussive dance forms.

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In A Town In-Between, Judith Ridner reveals the influential, turbulent past of a modest, quiet American community. Today Carlisle, Pennsylvania, nestled in the Susquehanna Valley, is far from the nation's political and financial centers. In the eighteenth century; however, Carlisle and its residents stood not only at a geographical crossroads but also at the fulcrum of early American controversies.

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In Irish history the Vikings are often seen merely as attackers, but this book gives an account of the wider picture - how the Vikings significantly influenced Irish art and trade and the growth of towns and cities.

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From the daring pirate-queen Grace O'Malley, to the fiery Protestant lawyer Theobald Wolfe Tone, and the courageous priest-patriot Fr John Murphy, Ireland's rebels have come from diverse backgrounds. But they all had one thing in common: they weren't afraid to take on a powerful Establishment and claim their right to self-determination.

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 Irish Seattle

 

 

 

The Puget Sound area has been greatly influenced by the Irish, and while many of the names and events are familiar, until now, their Irish connections were rarely acknowledged. Judge Thomas Burke, “The Man who Built Seattle,” had Irish parents. So did Washington’s second governor, John Harte McGraw. John Collins, who left Ireland at the tender age of 10 to seek his fame and fortune, became Seattle’s fourth mayor.

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The Irish in Haverhill, Massachusetts: Volume II

Irish immigration to Haverhill, Massachusetts, was a constant from the days of the Great Famine to the present. The immigrants, their children, and their grandchildren have become an integral part of the fabric of the city’s history. Some were teachers, politicians, police officers, and business owners, while others spent their lives as city laborers and factory workers. Whether these new residents were wealthy or poor, well known or little known, their experiences in America could not eliminate their common ties to the Emerald Isle. They collectively share a place in this “family album” of those Irish citizens who called Haverhill their new home. This volume is the sequel to the The Irish in Haverhill, Massachusetts, which was published in 1998. The response to that book was so enthusiastic that the author was overwhelmed with offers of additional photographs for a second volume.

Author

 Dr. Patricia Trainor O’Malley is a professor of history at Bradford College in Bradford, Massachusetts, and is the granddaughter of Irish immigrants to Haverhill. This is her fourth photographic history for Arcadia. Previous works include Bradford: The End of an Era, Haverhill, Massachusetts: From Town to City, and The Irish in Haverhill, Massachusetts.

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The revival of the St. Patrick’s Day parade in New Haven is a fantastic story. The parade was organized in 1842 as the captivating centerpiece of the city’s St. Patrick’s Day observance, yet it passed from the urban scene in the early 20th century. For 50 years, it faded from memory; however, New Haven’s Irish community retained a strong determination to honor its patron saint and celebrate its heritage.

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Since Thomas Dongan was appointed governor of New York by King James, the Irish have played an active role in shaping life on Staten Island. From the mid-19th century on, the Irish have comprised one of the largest ethnic groups in both New York City and Staten Island. The Irish have contributed to every facet of island life, including politics, religious and cultural affairs, finance, and athletics.

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It's quite unlikely that Pierre Laclede and Auguste Chouteau could have comprehended the scope of their undertaking in 1764 when they laid out the settlement on the western banks of the Mississippi that was to become the metropolis of St. Louis. Founded by the French, governed by the Spanish, and heavily populated by the English and Germans, the role that the Irish had in making St. Louis what it is today is often overlooked. The Irish are steeped in tradition, and that trait did not leave the Irish immigrants when they arrived in St. Louis and called this place home.

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The Irish have always been an important part of San Francisco. An 1852 census showed that almost nine percent of the city of 36,000 hailed from Ireland; by 1900, nearly a quarter of the population had come here from the Emerald Isle. Today a walk through any part of the city will showcase influential Irish street names such as Downey, Fell, Kearney, O’Farrell, O’Shaughnessy, and McAllister.

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Irish in Youngstown and the Greater Mahoning Valley

In 1796, Daniel Shehy of Tipperary was the first Irish man to settle in Youngstown. In the early nineteenth century, the Ulster Irish moved into the region. Later, massive waves of Irish refugees from the Potato Famine settled in the area and filled the labor needs of the steel mills, canals, and railroads.

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The history of the Irish in Chicago goes back to the days when the city was little more than an outpost on the prairie shores of Lake Michigan. Drawn by opportunities in the growing frontier town, Irish men and women who were fleeing economic hardship and famine in Ireland were quick to make their mark on Chicago's political, religious, and economic life.

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Considered to be one of the largest neighborhood-based St. Patrick's Day parades outside Dublin, Chicago's South Side Irish Parade began quite modestly, with 17 children under the age of 10 marching twice around the block. Dubbing themselves the "Wee Ones of Washtenaw and Talman," the founders of this great parade marched with homemade signs, costumes, and a baby buggy while neighbors and family members cheered them on.

 

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The Irish greatly contributed to the creation of the territory and state of Arizona due to their enterprising personalities and persistence in a difficult environment.

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More than 27 million Americans today can trace their lineage to the Scots, whose bloodline was stained by centuries of continuous warfare along the border between England and Scotland, and later in the bitter settlements of England’s Ulster Plantation in Northern Ireland. Between 250,000 and 400,000 Scots-Irish migrated to America in the eighteenth century, traveling in groups of families and bringing with them not only long experience as rebels and outcasts but also unparalleled skills as frontiersmen and guerrilla fighters. Their cultural identity reflected acute individualism, dislike of aristocracy and a military tradition, and, over time, the Scots-Irish defined the attitudes and values of the military, of working class America, and even of the peculiarly populist form of American democracy itself.

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In this groundbreaking work, Timothy McMahon reexamines the significance of the Gaelic Revival in forming Ireland’s national identity. United in their determination to preserve and extend the use of Irish as a spoken language and artistic medium, members of the Gaelic League profoundly influenced Irish culture and literature in the twentieth century. McMahon explores that influence by scrutinizing the ways in which society absorbed their leaders’ messages, tracing the interaction between the ideas propagated by the League and the variety of meanings ordinary people attached to Ireland and to being Irish.

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In this lively, engaging chronicle, best-selling author and storyteller Malachy McCourt delivers his own unique perspective on Irish history. As entertaining as he is informative, McCourt presents the sinners and saints of his homeland in an effort to understand Ireland through centuries of invasion, oppression and suffering.

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The twenty-eight people killed and wounded on Bloody Sunday were primarily young people. Eighteen of them were under thirty; of those, twelve were between the ages of 15 and 20. This book poignantly brings them to life by telling the life stories of the victims killed on Bloody Sunday. The stories of these people are both heartwarming and heartbreaking at the same time as family members and friends talk about the loved ones they lost because they decided to join in a protest for equal rights. The actions of the British Government and what they did after the slaughter of these innocent people is just sickening and certainly makes you realize why organizations such as the I.R.A. exist in the first place.

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