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Guerilla Days in Ireland

Biography and Memoirs
Typography

  Synopsis

A fresh contemporary edition of one of the most dramatic accounts of the Irish War of Independence ever written. Buy the Book!
First published in 1949, ‘Guerilla Days in Ireland’ is an extraordinary story of the Irish War of Independence and the fight between two unequal forces, which ended in the withdrawal of the British from twenty-six counties. Seven weeks before the Truce of July 1921, the British presence in County Cork consisted of a total of over 12,500 men. Against these British forces stood the Irish Republican Army whose flying columns never exceeded 310 riflemen in the whole of the county. These flying columns were small groups of dedicated Volunteers, severely commanded and disciplined. Constantly on the move, their paramount objective was merely to exist, to strike when conditions were favourable and to avoid disaster at all costs. In ‘Guerilla Days in Ireland’ Tom Barry describes the setting up of the West Cork flying column, its training and the plan of campaign, which he implemented. In particular he gives his account of the Kilmichael ambush, one of the most controversial episodes of the War of Independence.

Author

Tom Barry was born in 1898. In June 1915 he joined the British Army, not to secure home rule for Ireland or to fight for Irish freedom or for freedom of small nations-just to see what war was like. While fighting in Mesopotamia he heard of the 1916 Rising taking place at home. After the war he returned home and with some difficulty persuaded the IRA to trust him and to make use of his military experience. In the summer of 1920 he became training officer to the Third (West) Cork Brigade. Tom Barry fought on the republican side of the Civil War, was imprisoned and escaped. In the late 1930s he was Chief of Staff of the IRA. He died in 1980.