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Last of the Unicorns

Historical Fiction
Typography

Synopsis

Bartholomew “Bat” Lynch is an Irish immigrant who comes to America with his older sister, Mary, during Prohibition. Bat is a rover, a philosopher and, in many ways, a child who never grows up. Buy the Book!
He’s witty, light-hearted,  quick to tell a joke and even quicker to have a drink or two. During his lifetime, he works at numerous jobs, although most are short-lived. But, nevertheless, he has memorable experiences at each of them.
  
An immensely likable fellow, Bat is blessed with good luck and has an uncanny knack for landing on his  feet. But his real good fortune in life is Eileen, his wife, who stands by him through it all, loving, unfaltering and  steadfast.
       Bad blood exists between Bat and Eileen’s brother, Jerry, who also becomes his brother-in-law when he  weds Bat’s sister. Over the years Bat keeps the dark secret he knows about Jerry to himself, and Jerry’s hatred  for Bat continues to fester. It all comes to a head during Bat’s Irish home wake when divine retribution plays a  hand in evening up the score.
     This tome contains anecdotes that will make you laugh out loud along with heart-wrenching passages that  will evoke tears. It has innocence and intrigue, guile and goodness, decency and deception, mirth and mortality. Bat Lynch – like the fabled unicorn – is a most unique and unforgettable character that you’ll be thinking  about long after you read the last page.   It’s a life story; it’s a love story; it’s a lust story; it's funny; it’s sad; it’s whimsical; it's profane; and...it’s profound.
  www.tombenford.com
 

  About the Author

Tom Benford is a multiple award-winning author of more than eighteen published books including three on computer science and over a dozen on automotive and related subjects.
His first novel, The Last of the Unicorns, was published in mid-February, 2010 and is available in print, Kindle, and e-book formats.
A freelance journalist and photographer for over forty years, he has garnered awards for his writing from organizations that include the North Jersey Press Association, New Jersey Working Press Association, the International Automotive Media Association and others. He was inducted into the Bayonne (NJ) Writer's Hall of Fame in 1995 and was recently honored by a New Jersey Joint Legislative Resolution from the State Senate and General Assembly lauding his literary contributions and accomplishments.
Tom is also the publisher and editor-in-chief of www.AllAboutVettes.com, a free monthly on-line Corvette magazine that has been published since July of 2010. The magazine is advertiser-supported and 100% free to readers and features monthly prize giveaways in addition to numerous features, how-to articles, tech, restoration, upgrade, garage tips and other regular features.
He contributes articles on a regular basis to several national magazines and he is also an ASCAP award-winning song writer with a CD album of original instrumental music available on iTunes, CD Baby and other national digital and retail music outlets.
A native and lifelong resident of the Garden State, Tom and his wife of 33 years, Liz, reside with their German Shepherd dog, Major, on a 4+ acre estate on the New Jersey Shore. His website is www.tombenford.com



Sean Sexton has been collecting historic photographs of Ireland for forty years. His passion and expertise have made him a leader in the field.

Christine Kinealy is an Irish historian and author of over a dozen books on Irish history. She is Professor of History at the Caspersen School of Graduate Studies, Drew University.

For more information, please contact:
Harry Burton at 212.391.4609 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thames & Hudson books are distributed by W.W. Norton in the USA
and Penguin in Canada. Please visit thamesandhudsonusa.com

New in paperback
New format

“Lavishly produced…Full of rarely seen photos.”
—The Irish Echo

“Exceptional . . . a riveting visual chronicle, admirably unsentimental and richly informative.”
—The Irish Times