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 Set in 1912 during the Irish migration, on the hauntingly beautiful Great Blasket Island off the coast of Ireland, the gilded age of New York City and the streets of San Francisco, Dancing In The Heather is the story of Aeylish O’Kelly, a poor island girl who risks her life to save David Summerland, a wealthy playboy from San Francisco, when his boat capsizes in the wild Atlantic Ocean.    Buy Book Here!

 The Ancient Mystery that holds the secret of Newgrange

It was through the unmatched spiritual and physical prowess of these Celtic bloodlines that Ireland would become an impenetrable fortress and safe haven for the exceptional inheritance of western civilization, a reality which has been marginalized. Buy E-Book Here    Buy Book Here

   Synopsis

 Before the dawn of written history, horsemen from the steppes of Russia swept across the European continent settling initially in Germany's Hartz Mountains. Buy the Book
  Following their their conversion by priests from the British Isles to the Druid religion and laws, the Celts overran a swath of Europe from the British Isles southeast to Turkey, which they ruled for a thousand years.
    In addition to bringing iron to the continent, the Celts invented steel, the spoked wheel with its iron tire, and the iron plow, which enabled European nomads to settle in communities.
    In 387 BC, they defeated the Roman Army and invaded the eternal city. This epic battle dramatically changed the course of history. The Celts are truly the Founders of Europe.
    This is their story.

 Author

The grandson of Big John Meehan from Sligo, Mary Ellen McLaughlin-Keane from Galway, Bridget Munnelly from Mayo, and Matthew Smith from Cavan ended up with the least recognized Irish name of them all. I can’t begin to tell you how many times, I’ve been asked, “Smith, huh! English … right?” When I meet up with my ancestor Mac an Gabhann—the one who anglicized our family name to Smith—he and I are going to have words. Even my wife, Elizabeth McCarthy McGinty Smith, would’ve retained her maiden name if such a thing were fashionable when we were wed.
  Before I continue on to the little I’ve accomplished in life, there are a few items from my family history that need emphasizing. The Smith homestead in Beagh Upper, Parish of Upper Killenkere, was “situate” within 200 yards of where General Phil Sheridan was born. And since, my uncles have stated that their grandmother was a Sheridan, well … you do the math. If you have an issue with that, there’s no sense going into the story Big John Meehan told of my Galway-born grandmother being related to a member of Columbus’s crew.
    When I began writing narrative-history, I didn’t plan to write the complete Irish-American Story, it just happened, or it will happen when later this year I add, The Revolutionary War Irish to the series.

    An interest in the Druids and ancient Celts formed into a book when I learned the Celts invaded Rome in circa 500 BCE. This was followed by The Life and Times of Liam O’Donnell: which began as a tale of growing up Irish-Catholic in Philadelphia, then grew to an epic, including the major battles and events of WWII. Since the Liam book needed a companion, I wrote its sequel, Rory O’Donnell and the Kennedys to add the Korean War, Civil Rights, and Vietnam. The Last of the Fenians began as a whimsical tale about the Irish Republican Brotherhood stealing the Titanic’s sister ship; until, I stumbled across the fact that the first-formed Irish Division (the 10th)  fought in Gallipoli. The book then took off on a path of its own through WWI, the Anglo-Irish War, The Treaty, Ulster, ending with Michael Collins’ assassination in the Irish Civil War. As an aside, both my father and my Grandfather Smith were in Ireland during that period. Now I couldn’t let my likely cousin, Phil Sheridan, off easily, therefore; he became one of the main characters in The Civil War’s Valiant Irish. That’s when I realized I wasn’t just writing individual books, but the complete series about Irish-American accomplishments.

 Synopsis

 

Fadó, pronounced f’doe, is an Irish expression meaning “long ago” or “in years past.” The term was commonly recited as an introduction to old Irish stories related by a Seanchaidh (shana-'kee), a Gaelic word meaning a teller of tales, an antiquarian, or historian. A Seanchaidh was regarded as an important and highly revered member in Irish society.It is by this unique story-telling device that author Kevin O’Donnell chronicles the confluence of two distinct cultures: one in Ireland, the other in the American heartland.

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